Events Calendar

I Love Jazz provides this calendar as part of our commitment to promote the live jazz experience. It includes just some of the many opportunities in the St. Louis area to hear and see jazz performed by local, national, and international artists.

If your venue, educational institution, or jazz group would like to be included on the Jazz Calendar – contact John Baker at john@hectv.org.

For show times and ticket information – contact the venue or follow the link provided.

 

May 2016
  • 1st Sunday
  • 2nd Monday
  • 3rd Tuesday
  • 4th Wednesday
  • 5th Thursday
  • 6th Friday
  • 7th Saturday
  • 8th Sunday
  • 9th Monday
  • 10th Tuesday
  • 11th Wednesday
  • 12th Thursday
  • 13th Friday
  • 14th Saturday
  • 15th Sunday
  • 16th Monday
  • 17th Tuesday
  • 18th Wednesday
  • 19th Thursday
  • 20th Friday
  • 21st Saturday
  • 22nd Sunday
  • 23rd Monday
  • 24th Tuesday
  • 25th Wednesday
  • 26th Thursday
  • 27th Friday
  • 28th Saturday
  • 29th Sunday
  • 30th Monday
  • 31st Tuesday
  • May 1 | 8 PM

    Twisted Melodies

    Washington University's Edison Theatre 6445 Forsyth Blvd.

    Starts April 22. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m. Continues through May 1

    Donny Hathaway had everything going for him. He left St. Louis' Carr Square housing project for Howard University and became tight with Roberta Flack, but abandoned school to work for Curtis Mayfield's Custom Records as an arranger, writer and producer. In four short years he released a massive single ("Where is the Love?" -- a duet with Flack), a revered live album and co-wrote and sang the Christmas standard "This Christmas." At the peak of his professional career Hathaway began to suffer from crippling depression and paranoid delusions, which were eventually diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenia. Medication helped, but only when he took it regularly. Playwright Kelvin Rolston Jr.'s drama Twisted Melodies is a fictionalized journey into Hathaway's mind during the time he was trying to navigate his way through schizophrenia, the music industry and his home life. The Black Rep closes its season with Twisted Melodies. Performances take place at 7 p.m. Thursday, 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday (April 22 through May 1) at Washington University's Edison Theatre. Tickets are $30.

  • May 1 |

    Bosnian/American: The Dance for Life

    Fontbonne University Fine Arts Theatre 6800 Wydown Blvd. Clayton

    Thursdays-Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Continues through May 1

    Being American, we tend to think that any immigrant's journey to America is a success once they actually make it to the USA. But in reality that's only the half-way point. The everyday tasks that were easy in the old country -- how to get a driver's license, how to find a good doctor, how to find a job -- are all unknowns in the new country, and all must be solved while navigating a different language and culture. Deanna Jent's new play, Bosnian/American: The Dance for Life, is inspired by the experiences of St. Louis' Bosnian community during the wave of immigration that occurred in the 90s. The play is constructed from interviews Jent conducted with young adults who were born in Bosnia but are making their lives in St. Louis. Mustard Seed Theatre presents Bosnian/American at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday (April 21 to May 1) at Fontbonne University's Fine Arts Theatre

  • May 1 |

    Ivanov

    Gaslight Theater 358 N. Boyle Ave. St. Louis - Central West End

    Nikolai Ivanov has lost his zest for life. His job in the Russian government, his seriously ill wife, the troubling finances of his estate and his growing debts are all slowly suffocating him. His social circle reviles him for spending so much time visiting his friend Lebedev while his wife languishes at home, but Ivanov is compelled to do so; Lebedev's wife holds his debt, and he's continually trying to arrange for another loan to keep everything afloat. The fact that the Lebedevs' daughter is enamored of him only compounds the difficulties Ivanov is facing. His life implodes at a party, but this being a play by Anton Chekhov, the aftermath is filled with even more trials. St. Louis Actors' Studio presents Tom Stoppard's translation of Chekhov's Ivanov at 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 3 p.m. Sunday (April 15 to May 1) at the Gaslight Theatre

  • May 3 | 10 AM - 8 PM

    Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 8

    For many of us, the fear of spies and traitors in our midst lessened when the Cold War ended. But for the men and women who defend our country, that only marked a change in tactics. The fight to keep America safe from espionage and foreign agents has been going on since 1776, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, presents a detailed history of domestic terrorism from Benedict Arnold to Timothy McVeigh and beyond. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs was created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC, and it offers insight on the various threats that have plagued America, from the radicals of the post-World War I era to the modern militia movement. The exhibit is open daily through May 8 at the Missouri History Museum. Admission is free.

  • May 3 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 3 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 3 | 7:30

    The Sound of Music

    The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., May 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 1 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music has something for everyone: a love story between adults, a family outwitting the Nazis and a song that teaches you how to remember the musical notes. Is it any wonder that its popularity has only grown since its 1957 debut? A new production of The Sound of Music, directed by Jack O'Brien, is currently touring America. The show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26 to May 1) at the Fox Theatre

  • May 3 | 7:30 PM

    HC 2016 Suite Serenade

    “HC 2016 Suite Serenade”

    The Chamber Music Society of St. Louis welcomes back former Associate Conductor of St. Louis Symphony David Loebel with Warlock’s Capriol Suite, Mozart’s Eine kliene Nachtmusik and Tchaikovsky’s Serenade for Strings.

  • May 3 | 1 PM

    The Sound of Music – CLOSING DAY

    The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., May 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 1 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music has something for everyone: a love story between adults, a family outwitting the Nazis and a song that teaches you how to remember the musical notes. Is it any wonder that its popularity has only grown since its 1957 debut? A new production of The Sound of Music, directed by Jack O'Brien, is currently touring America. The show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26 to May 1) at the Fox Theatre

  • May 3 | 11 - 4 PM

    Georges Rouault: Miserere et Guerre

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA) 3700 W. Pine Mall St. Louis - Midtown

    The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (3700 West Pine Mall; mocra.slu.edu) possesses one of the few complete sets of Georges Rouault's etchings suite, Miserere et Guerre. Every decade or so the museum puts all 58 works on display, both to showcase Rouault's masterpiece and to remind us of the horrors of war. Rouault made these pieces between 1914 and 1927, drawing inspiration from the devastation of World War I and its lingering aftermath in his native France. They primarily depict human beings wracked by suffering and stalked by death, but there are also small instances of mercy to be found in them. His etching Wars, detested by mothers, shows a mother and child embracing in the encroaching darkness, their bodies haloed in the light of their love for each other

  • May 3 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Dark Matter: Terry M. Boyd + Amanda McCavour

    Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop

    Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Boyd and McCavour are both fiber artists who seek to express emotion through their work. For this show at the Craft Alliance, both artists delve deeply into more solemn feelings. Boyd creates menacing two-dimensional portraits of bleakness and despair through thickets of embroidery. All I Know, Is That I Know Nothing As to Why the Universe Exists features clusters of black floss running at crazy angles across a white background, studded by thick dark nodes where his needle has returned again and again. McCavour is represented by Black Cloud, a massive installation of feathery dark paper and loops of yarn that bell out from the ceiling to pool in strands and puddles of inky darkness.

  • May 3 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Dark Matter: Terry M. Boyd + Amanda McCavour – CLOSING DAY

    Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop

    Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Boyd and McCavour are both fiber artists who seek to express emotion through their work. For this show at the Craft Alliance, both artists delve deeply into more solemn feelings. Boyd creates menacing two-dimensional portraits of bleakness and despair through thickets of embroidery. All I Know, Is That I Know Nothing As to Why the Universe Exists features clusters of black floss running at crazy angles across a white background, studded by thick dark nodes where his needle has returned again and again. McCavour is represented by Black Cloud, a massive installation of feathery dark paper and loops of yarn that bell out from the ceiling to pool in strands and puddles of inky darkness.

  • May 3 | 7 - 8 PM

    Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin D. Martin House–Saving a House, Saving a City

    Saint Louis Art Museum Forest Park St. Louis - Forest Park

    Free public lecture on one of Wright’s greatest early works, The Darwin D. Martin House (1903-6) located in Buffalo, NY. Jack Quinan, Senior Curator Emeritus, will describe the restoration of the house and its impact on the preservation consciousness in Buffalo. Free, but tickets required. Advance tickets available at Art Museum info center. Limited tickets available at door at the event Presented by The Frank Lloyd Wright House in Ebsworth Park located at 120 N. Ballas in Saint Louis, MO. With suport from Regional Arts Commission.

  • May 4 | 8 - 10 PM

    Trash Macbeth

    The Chapel 6238 Alexander Dr.

    Starts April 20. Wednesdays, Thursdays, 8-10 p.m. and Fridays-Sundays, 8-10 p.m. Continues through May 7

    Lady Macbeth says, “What's done cannot be undone.” But can it be repurposed? Based on Shakespeare’s iconic tragedy, ERA's experimental production Trash Macbeth resuscitates meaning within a climate of destruction, reestablishes the societal norms of America’s most traditional era, and reframes the value of our revered Shakespeare, housewifery, and garbage. Trash Macbeth is a full-length, theatrical production created by an ensemble of theatre artists with text from Shakespeare's Macbeth, Emily Post's Etiquette, the book of Revelations, 1950's era advertisements, and more. We cordially invite you to the Macbeth’s residence for the dinner party of your life!

  • May 4 | 7:30

    The Sound of Music

    The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., May 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 1 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music has something for everyone: a love story between adults, a family outwitting the Nazis and a song that teaches you how to remember the musical notes. Is it any wonder that its popularity has only grown since its 1957 debut? A new production of The Sound of Music, directed by Jack O'Brien, is currently touring America. The show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26 to May 1) at the Fox Theatre

  • May 4 | 11 - 4 PM

    Georges Rouault: Miserere et Guerre

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA) 3700 W. Pine Mall St. Louis - Midtown

    The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (3700 West Pine Mall; mocra.slu.edu) possesses one of the few complete sets of Georges Rouault's etchings suite, Miserere et Guerre. Every decade or so the museum puts all 58 works on display, both to showcase Rouault's masterpiece and to remind us of the horrors of war. Rouault made these pieces between 1914 and 1927, drawing inspiration from the devastation of World War I and its lingering aftermath in his native France. They primarily depict human beings wracked by suffering and stalked by death, but there are also small instances of mercy to be found in them. His etching Wars, detested by mothers, shows a mother and child embracing in the encroaching darkness, their bodies haloed in the light of their love for each other

  • May 4 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Dark Matter: Terry M. Boyd + Amanda McCavour

    Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop

    Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Boyd and McCavour are both fiber artists who seek to express emotion through their work. For this show at the Craft Alliance, both artists delve deeply into more solemn feelings. Boyd creates menacing two-dimensional portraits of bleakness and despair through thickets of embroidery. All I Know, Is That I Know Nothing As to Why the Universe Exists features clusters of black floss running at crazy angles across a white background, studded by thick dark nodes where his needle has returned again and again. McCavour is represented by Black Cloud, a massive installation of feathery dark paper and loops of yarn that bell out from the ceiling to pool in strands and puddles of inky darkness.

  • May 4 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 8

    For many of us, the fear of spies and traitors in our midst lessened when the Cold War ended. But for the men and women who defend our country, that only marked a change in tactics. The fight to keep America safe from espionage and foreign agents has been going on since 1776, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, presents a detailed history of domestic terrorism from Benedict Arnold to Timothy McVeigh and beyond. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs was created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC, and it offers insight on the various threats that have plagued America, from the radicals of the post-World War I era to the modern militia movement. The exhibit is open daily through May 8 at the Missouri History Museum. Admission is free.

  • May 4 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 4 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 4 | 11 AM

    A Second Look: Gena Brady & John C. Seuc-Rocher

    Subterranean Books 6275 Delmar Blvd., St. Louis Delmar/ The Loop

    St. Louis is the subject of this dual exhibition by local photographers Gena Brady and John C. Seuc-Rocher. Both are intrigued by the parts of the city you see but don’t really notice, whether that's the pure geometry of parallel lines that a crash barrier makes when properly framed, or the little bits of life that are found even in abandoned parts of the city: flowering weeds, bouquets left behind on a wall, or the familiar sight of arms braced on the window frame of a passing car. Take note: During the opening reception, Subterranean will knock ten percent off the price of photography books.

  • May 4 | 12 PM

    St. Louis on the Air with John O’Leary

    St. Louis Public Radio at Grand Center, Community Room, 3651 Olive St., St. Louis, MO 63108

    St. Louis on the Air and Left Bank Books present nationally bestselling author John O'Leary, in a live broadcast conversation with Don Marsh about his book "On Fire: The 7 Choices to Ignite a Radically Inspired Life." This event is free and open to the public, but RSVPs are required. Please RSVP at left-bank.com/oleary. Proof of purchase of "On Fire" from Left Bank Books will be required to enter the signing line at this event. Note: Since this is a live broadcast event, please plan to arrive no later than 11:50am.
  • May 4 | 6:30 PM

    Japanese Architect Kengo Kuma

    Washington University-Steinberg Hall Forsyth & Skinker blvds University City

    Kengo Kuma, one of Japan's most influential architects, will deliver the annual CannonDesign Lecture for Excellence in Architecture and Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis. Titled "Anti Object," the free talk will take place in Steinberg Auditorium and is presented as part of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts’ spring Public Lecture Series.

  • May 5 | 8 PM

    The Addams Family: The Musical

    Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road Kirkwood

    Fri., April 29, 8 p.m., Sat., April 30, 8 p.m., Sun., May 1, 2 p.m., Thu., May 5, 8 p.m., Fri., May 6, 8 p.m., Sat., May 7, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 2 p.m.

    Morticia and Gomez can't help but be concerned when they find out their daughter, Wednesday has fallen in love with a kind, smart, handsome, and normal young man who comes from a respectable family from Ohio.Join the creepy, kooky and always lovable Addams family as they deal with their own version of growing pains.

  • May 5 | 8 PM

    The Glass Menagerie

    Kranzberg Arts Center 501 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63103

    Mary 5-15

    Upstream Theater blows the dust off The Glass Menagerie.  “Being a ‘memory play,’ The Glass Menagerie can be presented with unusual freedom of convention.” – Tennessee Williams.  As Williams’ classic has entered our collective memory, it has moved from cutting-edge to canonical. Our production aims to take the piece out of the museum in a way that’s guaranteed to move you, and move you to think.  Their cast features Linda Kennedy as Amanda, J. Samuel Davis as Tom, Sydney Frasure as Laura and Jason Contini as Jim. Live music by pianist Joe Dreyer.  Set by Michael Heil. Costumes by Laura Hanson. Lighting by Steve Carmichael. Props by Claudia Horn.  Directed by Philip Boehm.

  • May 5 | 7:30

    The Sound of Music

    The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., May 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 1 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music has something for everyone: a love story between adults, a family outwitting the Nazis and a song that teaches you how to remember the musical notes. Is it any wonder that its popularity has only grown since its 1957 debut? A new production of The Sound of Music, directed by Jack O'Brien, is currently touring America. The show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26 to May 1) at the Fox Theatre

  • May 5 | 11 - 4 PM

    Georges Rouault: Miserere et Guerre

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA) 3700 W. Pine Mall St. Louis - Midtown

    The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (3700 West Pine Mall; mocra.slu.edu) possesses one of the few complete sets of Georges Rouault's etchings suite, Miserere et Guerre. Every decade or so the museum puts all 58 works on display, both to showcase Rouault's masterpiece and to remind us of the horrors of war. Rouault made these pieces between 1914 and 1927, drawing inspiration from the devastation of World War I and its lingering aftermath in his native France. They primarily depict human beings wracked by suffering and stalked by death, but there are also small instances of mercy to be found in them. His etching Wars, detested by mothers, shows a mother and child embracing in the encroaching darkness, their bodies haloed in the light of their love for each other

  • May 5 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Dark Matter: Terry M. Boyd + Amanda McCavour

    Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop

    Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Boyd and McCavour are both fiber artists who seek to express emotion through their work. For this show at the Craft Alliance, both artists delve deeply into more solemn feelings. Boyd creates menacing two-dimensional portraits of bleakness and despair through thickets of embroidery. All I Know, Is That I Know Nothing As to Why the Universe Exists features clusters of black floss running at crazy angles across a white background, studded by thick dark nodes where his needle has returned again and again. McCavour is represented by Black Cloud, a massive installation of feathery dark paper and loops of yarn that bell out from the ceiling to pool in strands and puddles of inky darkness.

  • May 5 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 8

    For many of us, the fear of spies and traitors in our midst lessened when the Cold War ended. But for the men and women who defend our country, that only marked a change in tactics. The fight to keep America safe from espionage and foreign agents has been going on since 1776, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, presents a detailed history of domestic terrorism from Benedict Arnold to Timothy McVeigh and beyond. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs was created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC, and it offers insight on the various threats that have plagued America, from the radicals of the post-World War I era to the modern militia movement. The exhibit is open daily through May 8 at the Missouri History Museum. Admission is free.

  • May 5 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 5 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 5 | 8 - 10 PM

    Trash Macbeth

    The Chapel 6238 Alexander Dr.

    Starts April 20. Wednesdays, Thursdays, 8-10 p.m. and Fridays-Sundays, 8-10 p.m. Continues through May 7

    Lady Macbeth says, “What's done cannot be undone.” But can it be repurposed? Based on Shakespeare’s iconic tragedy, ERA's experimental production Trash Macbeth resuscitates meaning within a climate of destruction, reestablishes the societal norms of America’s most traditional era, and reframes the value of our revered Shakespeare, housewifery, and garbage. Trash Macbeth is a full-length, theatrical production created by an ensemble of theatre artists with text from Shakespeare's Macbeth, Emily Post's Etiquette, the book of Revelations, 1950's era advertisements, and more. We cordially invite you to the Macbeth’s residence for the dinner party of your life!

  • May 5 | 7 - 9 PM

    Culture Shock Film Series: America’s Blues

    Schlafly Bottleworks 7260 Southwest Ave Maplewood

    America's Blues An award winning locally produced documentary on the tremendous impact American Blues music has had on society, culture and the entertainment industry. Directed by Patrick Branson Written by St. Louisan's Patrick Branson & Aaron Pritchard First premiered at the St. Louis Filmmaker’s Showcase in 2015 Running Time 83 minutes All rights reserved. Screening in The Crown Room at Schlafly Bottleworks Co Hosted by Tom Stockman Intro and Q & A with Director Doors open @ 630 Food and drink available for purchase from Schlafly

  • May 5 | 7 PM

    Nancy Nau Sullivan

    Left Bank Books-Central West End 399 N Euclid Ave St. Louis - Central West End

    Left Bank Books presents former St. Louis reporter Nancy Nau Sullivan, who will sign and discuss her memoir, "The Last Cadillac." Middle-age is challenging enough, but when Sullivan suddenly finds herself caring for two children, grappling with her mother's death, and caring for her ailing father while navigating a contentious divorce and dealing with long-simmering sibling rivalries, she wonders how she can keep sane. Things get even more complicated when her siblings accuse her of "kidnapping" their father and carting him—and his Cadillac—off to Anna Maria Island, Florida, where they are greeted by Hurricane Josephine.

  • May 6 | 7 PM

    44th Annual Blueberry Hill Open Dart Tournament

    Blueberry Hill, 6504 Delmar in The Loop, St. Louis, 63130

    May 6-8

    Budweiser presents the largest and oldest pub tournament in North American returns to the dart room of Blueberry Hill May 8-10.  7 men’s events and 7 women’s events. $11,000 in prize money up for grabs!  Entry is open to all - Entry fees vary by event Spectators FREE! Get your picture on the Wall of Fame in Blueberry Hill’s Dart Room!

  • May 6 | 8 PM

    The Glass Menagerie

    Kranzberg Arts Center 501 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63103

    Mary 5-15

    Upstream Theater blows the dust off The Glass Menagerie.  “Being a ‘memory play,’ The Glass Menagerie can be presented with unusual freedom of convention.” – Tennessee Williams.  As Williams’ classic has entered our collective memory, it has moved from cutting-edge to canonical. Our production aims to take the piece out of the museum in a way that’s guaranteed to move you, and move you to think.  Their cast features Linda Kennedy as Amanda, J. Samuel Davis as Tom, Sydney Frasure as Laura and Jason Contini as Jim. Live music by pianist Joe Dreyer.  Set by Michael Heil. Costumes by Laura Hanson. Lighting by Steve Carmichael. Props by Claudia Horn.  Directed by Philip Boehm.

  • May 6 | 7:30

    The Sound of Music

    The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., May 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 1 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music has something for everyone: a love story between adults, a family outwitting the Nazis and a song that teaches you how to remember the musical notes. Is it any wonder that its popularity has only grown since its 1957 debut? A new production of The Sound of Music, directed by Jack O'Brien, is currently touring America. The show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26 to May 1) at the Fox Theatre

  • May 6 | 11 - 4 PM

    Georges Rouault: Miserere et Guerre

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA) 3700 W. Pine Mall St. Louis - Midtown

    The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (3700 West Pine Mall; mocra.slu.edu) possesses one of the few complete sets of Georges Rouault's etchings suite, Miserere et Guerre. Every decade or so the museum puts all 58 works on display, both to showcase Rouault's masterpiece and to remind us of the horrors of war. Rouault made these pieces between 1914 and 1927, drawing inspiration from the devastation of World War I and its lingering aftermath in his native France. They primarily depict human beings wracked by suffering and stalked by death, but there are also small instances of mercy to be found in them. His etching Wars, detested by mothers, shows a mother and child embracing in the encroaching darkness, their bodies haloed in the light of their love for each other

  • May 6 | 10 AM - 6 PM

    Dark Matter: Terry M. Boyd + Amanda McCavour

    Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop

    Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Boyd and McCavour are both fiber artists who seek to express emotion through their work. For this show at the Craft Alliance, both artists delve deeply into more solemn feelings. Boyd creates menacing two-dimensional portraits of bleakness and despair through thickets of embroidery. All I Know, Is That I Know Nothing As to Why the Universe Exists features clusters of black floss running at crazy angles across a white background, studded by thick dark nodes where his needle has returned again and again. McCavour is represented by Black Cloud, a massive installation of feathery dark paper and loops of yarn that bell out from the ceiling to pool in strands and puddles of inky darkness.

  • May 6 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 8

    For many of us, the fear of spies and traitors in our midst lessened when the Cold War ended. But for the men and women who defend our country, that only marked a change in tactics. The fight to keep America safe from espionage and foreign agents has been going on since 1776, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, presents a detailed history of domestic terrorism from Benedict Arnold to Timothy McVeigh and beyond. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs was created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC, and it offers insight on the various threats that have plagued America, from the radicals of the post-World War I era to the modern militia movement. The exhibit is open daily through May 8 at the Missouri History Museum. Admission is free.

  • May 6 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 6 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 6 | 8 - 10 PM

    Trash Macbeth

    The Chapel 6238 Alexander Dr.

    Starts April 20. Wednesdays, Thursdays, 8-10 p.m. and Fridays-Sundays, 8-10 p.m. Continues through May 7

    Lady Macbeth says, “What's done cannot be undone.” But can it be repurposed? Based on Shakespeare’s iconic tragedy, ERA's experimental production Trash Macbeth resuscitates meaning within a climate of destruction, reestablishes the societal norms of America’s most traditional era, and reframes the value of our revered Shakespeare, housewifery, and garbage. Trash Macbeth is a full-length, theatrical production created by an ensemble of theatre artists with text from Shakespeare's Macbeth, Emily Post's Etiquette, the book of Revelations, 1950's era advertisements, and more. We cordially invite you to the Macbeth’s residence for the dinner party of your life!

  • May 6 | 8 PM

    The Addams Family: The Musical

    Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road Kirkwood

    Fri., April 29, 8 p.m., Sat., April 30, 8 p.m., Sun., May 1, 2 p.m., Thu., May 5, 8 p.m., Fri., May 6, 8 p.m., Sat., May 7, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 2 p.m.

    Morticia and Gomez can't help but be concerned when they find out their daughter, Wednesday has fallen in love with a kind, smart, handsome, and normal young man who comes from a respectable family from Ohio.Join the creepy, kooky and always lovable Addams family as they deal with their own version of growing pains.

  • May 6 | 6 - 10 PM

    Laumeier Art Fair

    Laumeier Sculpture Park 12580 Rott Road Crestwood/ Sunset Hills/ Sappington/ South Lindbergh

    Finding a gift for Mother's Day is difficult because of the nature of moms. They always tell you things like "I don't need anything but you to be happy." What's a grateful kid to do with that? This year, give her everything she wants by escorting her to the Laumeier Art Fair. You get to spend the day together (which is what she really wants), browsing the stalls of more than 150 artists and enjoying food and drinks from local vendors. And if you see her eyes light up when she tries on a certain pendant or handles a glass vase, you'll know exactly what she'd like as a gift. The art fair runs from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday (May 6 to 8) at Laumeier Sculpture Park

  • May 6 | 6 - 10 PM

    21st Annual St. Louis Microfest

    Forest Park Highway 40 (I-64) & Hampton Ave. St. Louis - Forest Park

    The St. Louis Microfest is one of the premiere festivals in the St. Louis area! Microfest is a beer tasting festival that offers festivals goers the chance to sample international and craft beers at 3 different session times over 2 days. The festival also includes live music, silent auction, food, demonstrations by local brewers and chefs, and more than enough fun!

  • May 6 | 8 PM

    Arianna String Quartet: Beethoven’s Triumph

    Blanche M Touhill Performing Arts Center 1 University Dr at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    The ASQ’s season finale begins with Edvard Grieg’s electrifying String Quartet in G minor, Op.27, an audience favorite that soars with a breadth of expression and powerful resonance like no other in the string quartet repertoire. Grieg: Quartet in G minor, Op.27; Beethoven: String Quartet in C# minor, Op.131

  • May 6 | 11 AM - 10 PM

    Vincent Fleming Art Exhibit

    The Old Bakery Beer Company 400 Landmarks Blvd. Grafton/ Godfrey/ Alton

    Dark Horse Art Works is pleased to announce the Vincent Fleming Art Exhibit. The exhibit is free and open to the public. The art collection of nationally known artist Vincent Fleming consist of stunning fantasy paintings. High quality oil paints create stunning dragons, carousels and more. Castles are visited by fairies, mermaids and lovers. Elaborate stagecoaches carry passengers over ornate bridges. This is fantasy art at it’s finest. The paintings will be available framed and unframed and copies of the prints will be available on high quality paper or printed on canvas.

  • May 6 | 5:30 - 8 PM

    Form and Function

    Foundry Art Centre 520 N. Main Center St. Charles

    The Foundry Art Centre will open three new exhibitions on Friday, May 6, 2016 with a free reception that evening from 6:00pm – 8:00pm. In Gallery I and II, Form and Function examines the principle of “form follows function." Artwork that supports, explores, and challenges this principle will be on display through Friday, June 17, 2016. A gallery talk will be given by the Foundry Art Centre’s Executive Director and Exhibitions Manager, Melissa Whitwam, at 5:30pm before the reception begins.

  • May 6 | 8 - 10:30 PM

    Laughing Stock

    Southampton Presbyterian Church 4716 Macklind St. Louis - St. Louis Hills

    A hilarious backstage farce and genuinely affectionate look into the world of the theatre. When The Playhouse, a rustic New England summer stock theatre, schedules a repertory season of Dracula, Hamlet and Charley's Aunt, comic mayhem ensues. We follow the well-intentioned but over-matched company from outrageous auditions to ego-driven rehearsals through opening nights gone disastrously awry to the elation of a great play well told and the comic and nostalgic season close.

  • May 7 | 8 PM

    The Glass Menagerie

    Kranzberg Arts Center 501 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63103

    Mary 5-15

    Upstream Theater blows the dust off The Glass Menagerie.  “Being a ‘memory play,’ The Glass Menagerie can be presented with unusual freedom of convention.” – Tennessee Williams.  As Williams’ classic has entered our collective memory, it has moved from cutting-edge to canonical. Our production aims to take the piece out of the museum in a way that’s guaranteed to move you, and move you to think.  Their cast features Linda Kennedy as Amanda, J. Samuel Davis as Tom, Sydney Frasure as Laura and Jason Contini as Jim. Live music by pianist Joe Dreyer.  Set by Michael Heil. Costumes by Laura Hanson. Lighting by Steve Carmichael. Props by Claudia Horn.  Directed by Philip Boehm.

  • May 7 | 10:30 AM

    44th Annual Blueberry Hill Open Dart Tournament

    Blueberry Hill, 6504 Delmar in The Loop, St. Louis, 63130

    May 6-8

    Budweiser presents the largest and oldest pub tournament in North American returns to the dart room of Blueberry Hill May 8-10.  7 men’s events and 7 women’s events. $11,000 in prize money up for grabs!  Entry is open to all - Entry fees vary by event Spectators FREE! Get your picture on the Wall of Fame in Blueberry Hill’s Dart Room!

  • May 7 | 2 & 7:30

    The Sound of Music

    The Fox Theatre 527 N. Grand Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Saturdays, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Tuesdays-Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sun., May 1, 1 & 6:30 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 1 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Rodgers & Hammerstein's The Sound of Music has something for everyone: a love story between adults, a family outwitting the Nazis and a song that teaches you how to remember the musical notes. Is it any wonder that its popularity has only grown since its 1957 debut? A new production of The Sound of Music, directed by Jack O'Brien, is currently touring America. The show is presented at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 1 p.m. Sunday (April 26 to May 1) at the Fox Theatre

  • May 7 | 11 - 4 PM

    Georges Rouault: Miserere et Guerre

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA) 3700 W. Pine Mall St. Louis - Midtown

    The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (3700 West Pine Mall; mocra.slu.edu) possesses one of the few complete sets of Georges Rouault's etchings suite, Miserere et Guerre. Every decade or so the museum puts all 58 works on display, both to showcase Rouault's masterpiece and to remind us of the horrors of war. Rouault made these pieces between 1914 and 1927, drawing inspiration from the devastation of World War I and its lingering aftermath in his native France. They primarily depict human beings wracked by suffering and stalked by death, but there are also small instances of mercy to be found in them. His etching Wars, detested by mothers, shows a mother and child embracing in the encroaching darkness, their bodies haloed in the light of their love for each other

  • May 7 | 10 AM - 6 PM

    Dark Matter: Terry M. Boyd + Amanda McCavour

    Craft Alliance Center of Art + Design 6640 Delmar Blvd., University City Delmar/ The Loop

    Fridays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 8

    Boyd and McCavour are both fiber artists who seek to express emotion through their work. For this show at the Craft Alliance, both artists delve deeply into more solemn feelings. Boyd creates menacing two-dimensional portraits of bleakness and despair through thickets of embroidery. All I Know, Is That I Know Nothing As to Why the Universe Exists features clusters of black floss running at crazy angles across a white background, studded by thick dark nodes where his needle has returned again and again. McCavour is represented by Black Cloud, a massive installation of feathery dark paper and loops of yarn that bell out from the ceiling to pool in strands and puddles of inky darkness.

  • May 7 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 8

    For many of us, the fear of spies and traitors in our midst lessened when the Cold War ended. But for the men and women who defend our country, that only marked a change in tactics. The fight to keep America safe from espionage and foreign agents has been going on since 1776, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, presents a detailed history of domestic terrorism from Benedict Arnold to Timothy McVeigh and beyond. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs was created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC, and it offers insight on the various threats that have plagued America, from the radicals of the post-World War I era to the modern militia movement. The exhibit is open daily through May 8 at the Missouri History Museum. Admission is free.

  • May 7 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 7 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 7 | 8 - 10 PM

    Trash Macbeth

    The Chapel 6238 Alexander Dr.

    Starts April 20. Wednesdays, Thursdays, 8-10 p.m. and Fridays-Sundays, 8-10 p.m. Continues through May 7

    Lady Macbeth says, “What's done cannot be undone.” But can it be repurposed? Based on Shakespeare’s iconic tragedy, ERA's experimental production Trash Macbeth resuscitates meaning within a climate of destruction, reestablishes the societal norms of America’s most traditional era, and reframes the value of our revered Shakespeare, housewifery, and garbage. Trash Macbeth is a full-length, theatrical production created by an ensemble of theatre artists with text from Shakespeare's Macbeth, Emily Post's Etiquette, the book of Revelations, 1950's era advertisements, and more. We cordially invite you to the Macbeth’s residence for the dinner party of your life!

  • May 7 | 8 PM

    The Addams Family: The Musical

    Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road Kirkwood

    Fri., April 29, 8 p.m., Sat., April 30, 8 p.m., Sun., May 1, 2 p.m., Thu., May 5, 8 p.m., Fri., May 6, 8 p.m., Sat., May 7, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 2 p.m.

    Morticia and Gomez can't help but be concerned when they find out their daughter, Wednesday has fallen in love with a kind, smart, handsome, and normal young man who comes from a respectable family from Ohio.Join the creepy, kooky and always lovable Addams family as they deal with their own version of growing pains.

  • May 7 | 10 AM - 8 PM

    Laumeier Art Fair

    Laumeier Sculpture Park 12580 Rott Road Crestwood/ Sunset Hills/ Sappington/ South Lindbergh

    Finding a gift for Mother's Day is difficult because of the nature of moms. They always tell you things like "I don't need anything but you to be happy." What's a grateful kid to do with that? This year, give her everything she wants by escorting her to the Laumeier Art Fair. You get to spend the day together (which is what she really wants), browsing the stalls of more than 150 artists and enjoying food and drinks from local vendors. And if you see her eyes light up when she tries on a certain pendant or handles a glass vase, you'll know exactly what she'd like as a gift. The art fair runs from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday (May 6 to 8) at Laumeier Sculpture Park

  • May 7 | 1 - 5 & 6:30 - 9:30 PM

    21st Annual St. Louis Microfest

    Forest Park Highway 40 (I-64) & Hampton Ave. St. Louis - Forest Park

    The St. Louis Microfest is one of the premiere festivals in the St. Louis area! Microfest is a beer tasting festival that offers festivals goers the chance to sample international and craft beers at 3 different session times over 2 days. The festival also includes live music, silent auction, food, demonstrations by local brewers and chefs, and more than enough fun!

  • May 7 | 10 AM

    Free Comic Book Day

    The Wizard's Wagon 6388 Delmar Blvd. University City

    Do you love comic books, or are you perhaps comics-curious? Conversely, do you enjoy all those superhero films and want to give comics a try? Free Comic Book Day is your easiest point of entry into the four-color world of comics. All you need to do is go to a participating comic shop on the first Saturday in May — that's today — and collect the free books on offer. This year's crop of gratis offerings include the highly-anticipated revamp of Rom, an issue of the long-running indie comic Love and Rockets, and Tumblr's favorite hero, One Punch Man. Over at the new location of the Wizard's Wagon (6388 Delmar Boulevard, University City), you'll also enjoy a performance by Super Fun Yeah Yeah Rocketship and guest artists from the Ink & Drink Comics between 10 a.m. and 9 p.m. Downtown, Star Clipper (1319 Washington Avenue) is open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., and it offers a "design a superhero contest" for the kids, the Keya & Renee Trivia Challenge and, of course, free comics. If you line up before 10 a.m. you get a raffle ticket that allows you to pick up three extra freebies. One ticketholder will win a free comic every week until next year's event.

  • May 7 | 3 PM

    Fierce Reads: Cecelia Ahern, Harriet Reuter Hapgood, Marie Rutkoski & Emma Mills

    St. Louis Public Library 225 N. Euclid Ave. St. Louis - Central West End

    Left Bank Books welcomes the Fierce Reads tour to St. Louis, featuring Cecelia Ahern ("Flawed"), Harriet Reuter Hapgood ("The Square Root of Summer"), Marie Rutkoski ("The Winner's Kiss"), and special guest Emma Mills ("First & Then")! For more information, visit left-bank.com/fierce-reads.

  • May 7 | 8 - 10:30 PM

    Laughing Stock

    Southampton Presbyterian Church 4716 Macklind St. Louis - St. Louis Hills

    A hilarious backstage farce and genuinely affectionate look into the world of the theatre. When The Playhouse, a rustic New England summer stock theatre, schedules a repertory season of Dracula, Hamlet and Charley's Aunt, comic mayhem ensues. We follow the well-intentioned but over-matched company from outrageous auditions to ego-driven rehearsals through opening nights gone disastrously awry to the elation of a great play well told and the comic and nostalgic season close.

  • May 8 | 7 PM

    The Glass Menagerie

    Kranzberg Arts Center 501 N Grand Blvd, St. Louis, MO 63103

    Mary 5-15

    Upstream Theater blows the dust off The Glass Menagerie.  “Being a ‘memory play,’ The Glass Menagerie can be presented with unusual freedom of convention.” – Tennessee Williams.  As Williams’ classic has entered our collective memory, it has moved from cutting-edge to canonical. Our production aims to take the piece out of the museum in a way that’s guaranteed to move you, and move you to think.  Their cast features Linda Kennedy as Amanda, J. Samuel Davis as Tom, Sydney Frasure as Laura and Jason Contini as Jim. Live music by pianist Joe Dreyer.  Set by Michael Heil. Costumes by Laura Hanson. Lighting by Steve Carmichael. Props by Claudia Horn.  Directed by Philip Boehm.

  • May 8 | 10:30 AM

    44th Annual Blueberry Hill Open Dart Tournament

    Blueberry Hill, 6504 Delmar in The Loop, St. Louis, 63130

    May 6-8

    Budweiser presents the largest and oldest pub tournament in North American returns to the dart room of Blueberry Hill May 8-10.  7 men’s events and 7 women’s events. $11,000 in prize money up for grabs!  Entry is open to all - Entry fees vary by event Spectators FREE! Get your picture on the Wall of Fame in Blueberry Hill’s Dart Room!

  • May 8 | 11 - 4 PM

    Georges Rouault: Miserere et Guerre – CLOSING DAY

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (MOCRA) 3700 W. Pine Mall St. Louis - Midtown

    The Museum of Contemporary Religious Art (3700 West Pine Mall; mocra.slu.edu) possesses one of the few complete sets of Georges Rouault's etchings suite, Miserere et Guerre. Every decade or so the museum puts all 58 works on display, both to showcase Rouault's masterpiece and to remind us of the horrors of war. Rouault made these pieces between 1914 and 1927, drawing inspiration from the devastation of World War I and its lingering aftermath in his native France. They primarily depict human beings wracked by suffering and stalked by death, but there are also small instances of mercy to be found in them. His etching Wars, detested by mothers, shows a mother and child embracing in the encroaching darkness, their bodies haloed in the light of their love for each other

  • May 8 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Continues through May 8

    For many of us, the fear of spies and traitors in our midst lessened when the Cold War ended. But for the men and women who defend our country, that only marked a change in tactics. The fight to keep America safe from espionage and foreign agents has been going on since 1776, and it shows no signs of slowing down any time soon. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs: Fear and Freedom in America, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, presents a detailed history of domestic terrorism from Benedict Arnold to Timothy McVeigh and beyond. Spies, Traitors, Saboteurs was created by the International Spy Museum in Washington, DC, and it offers insight on the various threats that have plagued America, from the radicals of the post-World War I era to the modern militia movement. The exhibit is open daily through May 8 at the Missouri History Museum. Admission is free.

  • May 8 | 2 PM

    The Addams Family: The Musical – CLOSING DAY

    Robert G. Reim Theatre 111 S. Geyer Road Kirkwood

    Fri., April 29, 8 p.m., Sat., April 30, 8 p.m., Sun., May 1, 2 p.m., Thu., May 5, 8 p.m., Fri., May 6, 8 p.m., Sat., May 7, 8 p.m. and Sun., May 8, 2 p.m.

    Morticia and Gomez can't help but be concerned when they find out their daughter, Wednesday has fallen in love with a kind, smart, handsome, and normal young man who comes from a respectable family from Ohio.Join the creepy, kooky and always lovable Addams family as they deal with their own version of growing pains.

  • May 8 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Laumeier Art Fair

    Laumeier Sculpture Park 12580 Rott Road Crestwood/ Sunset Hills/ Sappington/ South Lindbergh

    Finding a gift for Mother's Day is difficult because of the nature of moms. They always tell you things like "I don't need anything but you to be happy." What's a grateful kid to do with that? This year, give her everything she wants by escorting her to the Laumeier Art Fair. You get to spend the day together (which is what she really wants), browsing the stalls of more than 150 artists and enjoying food and drinks from local vendors. And if you see her eyes light up when she tries on a certain pendant or handles a glass vase, you'll know exactly what she'd like as a gift. The art fair runs from 6 to 10 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday (May 6 to 8) at Laumeier Sculpture Park

  • May 8 | 3 PM

    R. Carlos Nakai, Native American Flutist

    St. Louis Community College-Meramec 11333 Big Bend Road Kirkwood

    R. Carlos Nakai, renowned Native American Flutist will be the guest artist in the "Chaco Symphony" performing with the Meramec Community Orchestra and Symphonic Band on May 8 at 3PM. "Chaco Symphony is an original ten movement piece composed and conducted by Gary Gackstatter, professor at Meramec. Free and open to the public.

  • May 8 | 2 - 4:30 PM

    Laughing Stock

    Southampton Presbyterian Church 4716 Macklind St. Louis - St. Louis Hills

    A hilarious backstage farce and genuinely affectionate look into the world of the theatre. When The Playhouse, a rustic New England summer stock theatre, schedules a repertory season of Dracula, Hamlet and Charley's Aunt, comic mayhem ensues. We follow the well-intentioned but over-matched company from outrageous auditions to ego-driven rehearsals through opening nights gone disastrously awry to the elation of a great play well told and the comic and nostalgic season close.

  • May 9 | 4 PM

    Chamber Music Society of St. Louis’ Orchestral Excerpts Master Class

    Sheldon Ballroom, 3648 Washington Blvd, St. Louis, 63108

    Chamber Music Society of St. Louis offers a Master Class Series for students.  Their Orchestral Excerpts Master Class features Bjorn Ranheim as Instructor. Students interested in participating in a Master Class can email alvin@chambermusicstl.org.  Participant forms are available here. Once CMSSL receives this entry form you will be contacted, and placed in the appropriate Master Class. CMSSL knows the Master Class Program will be of great benefit to young music students, and we are very excited about this program. Qualifying students must be enrolled in a music education program, with a music instructor, private lesson instructor or similar musical guidance. Preparation for the Master Class can include a solo instrument and/or chamber ensembles. These Master Classes will be instructed by musicians chosen by Chamber Music Society of St. Louis

  • May 10 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 10 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 11 | 5:30 PM

    Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis

    Grand Center and the Central Corridor N. Grand Blvd. & Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63103

    May 11-15

    St. Louis pays homage to the city’s favorite playwright with this first annual theater festival.  A variety of theatrical, artistic and educational events presented on both conventional and unexpected stages will celebrate the art and influence of Tennessee Williams

  • May 11 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 11 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 12 | 11 AM - 4 PM

    Linda Skrainka: Reflections

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Art 3663 Lindell Blvd.

    Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through May 15

    This critical survey of Linda Skrainka’s work features more than 50 paintings and drawings created by the native St. Louisan. Her interest in the small details that make each person’s life unique informs her work, which is in turn supported by excerpts from her journals. These written passages reveal her concerns about both her process and her technical skills. They also serve to place each piece in the larger context of her life. Reflections remains up through Sunday, May 15, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday.

  • May 12 | 10 AM

    Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis

    Grand Center and the Central Corridor N. Grand Blvd. & Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63103

    May 11-15

    St. Louis pays homage to the city’s favorite playwright with this first annual theater festival.  A variety of theatrical, artistic and educational events presented on both conventional and unexpected stages will celebrate the art and influence of Tennessee Williams

  • May 12 | 7:30 AM - 10:30 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 12 | 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 12 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • May 12 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 12 | 12 - 5 PM

    Winter/Spring Exhibition

    The Sheldon 3648 Washington

    Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 21

    The Sheldon welcomes spring (it's almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile,Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Storiestakes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

  • May 12 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 12 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 12 | 7:30 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 12 | 10 AM - 4 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 12 | 9 AM - 9 PM

    The Science and Spirit of Death, Grief and Beyond

    Sheraton Westport Lakeside Chalet I-270 and Page Ave. Maryland Heights

    A four-day experiential conference featuring the best and the brightest in afterlife research, end-of-life care, bereavement and spiritual approaches to a higher understanding of death and beyond. Medics, mystics, scholars and spiritualists share their wisdom in workshops, lectures, sacred ceremonies and more!

  • May 12 | 7:30

    The Two-Character Play

    The Learning Center 4504 Westminster Place St. Louis - Central West End

    Thu., May 12, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 13, 8 p.m., Sat., May 14, 3 p.m. and Sun., May 15, 3 p.m.

    Felice and his sister Clare are both actors. They're stuck in an unnamed theater, abandoned by the company they were traveling with because of their mental instability. Felice is trying to finish his latest script, The Two-Character Play, which is about a brother and sister trapped in a tumble-down Southern mansion after the murder-suicide of their parents. As you might imagine, the lives of the two actors and their characters intersect and become entangled before the night is over. Tennessee Williams spent more than a decade writing The Two-Character Play, which is an experimental, meta-textual exploration of his frequent themes of family and stage. The Midnight Company presents this later play as part of the Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. Michelle Hand and Joe Hanrahan star in the production, which is performed at 7:30 p.m

  • May 13 | 10 AM

    Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis

    Grand Center and the Central Corridor N. Grand Blvd. & Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63103

    May 11-15

    St. Louis pays homage to the city’s favorite playwright with this first annual theater festival.  A variety of theatrical, artistic and educational events presented on both conventional and unexpected stages will celebrate the art and influence of Tennessee Williams

  • May 13 | 7:30 AM - 5 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 13 | 10:00 AM–9:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 13 | 10 AM - 9 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • May 13 | 10 AM - 9 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 13 | 12 - 5 PM

    Winter/Spring Exhibition

    The Sheldon 3648 Washington

    Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 21

    The Sheldon welcomes spring (it's almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile,Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Storiestakes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

  • May 13 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 13 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 13 | 11 AM - 4 PM

    Linda Skrainka: Reflections

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Art 3663 Lindell Blvd.

    Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through May 15

    This critical survey of Linda Skrainka’s work features more than 50 paintings and drawings created by the native St. Louisan. Her interest in the small details that make each person’s life unique informs her work, which is in turn supported by excerpts from her journals. These written passages reveal her concerns about both her process and her technical skills. They also serve to place each piece in the larger context of her life. Reflections remains up through Sunday, May 15, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday.

  • May 13 | 10 AM - 4 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 13 | 9 AM - 9 PM

    The Science and Spirit of Death, Grief and Beyond

    Sheraton Westport Lakeside Chalet I-270 and Page Ave. Maryland Heights

    A four-day experiential conference featuring the best and the brightest in afterlife research, end-of-life care, bereavement and spiritual approaches to a higher understanding of death and beyond. Medics, mystics, scholars and spiritualists share their wisdom in workshops, lectures, sacred ceremonies and more!

  • May 13 | 8 PM

    St. Louis Rooming House Plays

    Robert H. Stockton House 3508 Samuel Shepard Dr St. Louis - Grand Center

    Tennessee Williams frequently revisited the same themes in his one-act plays, such as loneliness, the disintegration of a (his) family and the way a job can hold you back and destroy your freedom. St. Louis Rooming House Plays presents four Williams' one-acts that take place in a single rented room. "Hello from Bertha" is about a prostitute at the end of her life clinging to her dignity. A shoe salesman who is hung up on memories of his glory days is the subject of "The Last of My Solid Gold Watches." A showgirl decides to give up life on the road and settle down in St. Louis in "In Our Profession," but she fears she may have picked the wrong man to be her anchor. "The Pink Bedroom" stars a mistress who uses the only power she has to great effect. St. Louis Rooming House Plays is part of the Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis, and is performed at 8 p.m. at Stockton House

  • May 13 | 8 PM

    The Two-Character Play

    The Learning Center 4504 Westminster Place St. Louis - Central West End

    Thu., May 12, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 13, 8 p.m., Sat., May 14, 3 p.m. and Sun., May 15, 3 p.m.

    Felice and his sister Clare are both actors. They're stuck in an unnamed theater, abandoned by the company they were traveling with because of their mental instability. Felice is trying to finish his latest script, The Two-Character Play, which is about a brother and sister trapped in a tumble-down Southern mansion after the murder-suicide of their parents. As you might imagine, the lives of the two actors and their characters intersect and become entangled before the night is over. Tennessee Williams spent more than a decade writing The Two-Character Play, which is an experimental, meta-textual exploration of his frequent themes of family and stage. The Midnight Company presents this later play as part of the Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. Michelle Hand and Joe Hanrahan star in the production, which is performed at 7:30 p.m

  • May 14 | 10 AM

    Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis

    Grand Center and the Central Corridor N. Grand Blvd. & Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63103

    May 11-15

    St. Louis pays homage to the city’s favorite playwright with this first annual theater festival.  A variety of theatrical, artistic and educational events presented on both conventional and unexpected stages will celebrate the art and influence of Tennessee Williams

  • May 14 | 8 AM - 4 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 14 | 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 14 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • May 14 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 14 | 10 AM - 2 PM

    Winter/Spring Exhibition

    The Sheldon 3648 Washington

    Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 21

    The Sheldon welcomes spring (it's almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile,Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Storiestakes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

  • May 14 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present – CLOSING DAY

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Gallery 210

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 14

    St. Louis was the first city with a major type foundry in the Midwest, which helped St. Louis attract the printers, publishers, writers and artists who created and documented the daily life and creative output of a growing metropolis. The exhibition Cast and Recast: St. Louis Type Past and Present celebrates the historic Central Type Foundry St. Louis (1870 to 1892) with posters made by contemporary typographers and graphic designers using Ben Kiel's modern homage to the Central Type Foundry's "Geometric" typeface. Traci Moore's piece Geometrica uses the stark image of black and white fists raised together against a red background with a quote from Elie Wiesel. Misty Manley memorializes the malapropisms of Nova Scotian folk hero Ricky (from Trailer Park Boys) by enshrining them in representative icons against a subtle background of trailer park detritus in her piece, The Politics of Ricky. Cast and Recast opens with a free reception at 5 p.m. today at UMSL's Gallery 210 (44 East Drive, between the UMSL North MetroLink stop and the Touhill; 31-516-5976). The show remains up through Saturday, May 14, with the gallery open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. Admission is free.

  • May 14 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 14 | 8 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 14 | 11 AM - 4 PM

    Linda Skrainka: Reflections

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Art 3663 Lindell Blvd.

    Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through May 15

    This critical survey of Linda Skrainka’s work features more than 50 paintings and drawings created by the native St. Louisan. Her interest in the small details that make each person’s life unique informs her work, which is in turn supported by excerpts from her journals. These written passages reveal her concerns about both her process and her technical skills. They also serve to place each piece in the larger context of her life. Reflections remains up through Sunday, May 15, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday.

  • May 14 | 10 AM - 4 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 14 | 9 AM - 9 PM

    The Science and Spirit of Death, Grief and Beyond

    Sheraton Westport Lakeside Chalet I-270 and Page Ave. Maryland Heights

    A four-day experiential conference featuring the best and the brightest in afterlife research, end-of-life care, bereavement and spiritual approaches to a higher understanding of death and beyond. Medics, mystics, scholars and spiritualists share their wisdom in workshops, lectures, sacred ceremonies and more!

  • May 14 | 3 PM

    The Two-Character Play

    The Learning Center 4504 Westminster Place St. Louis - Central West End

    Thu., May 12, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 13, 8 p.m., Sat., May 14, 3 p.m. and Sun., May 15, 3 p.m.

    Felice and his sister Clare are both actors. They're stuck in an unnamed theater, abandoned by the company they were traveling with because of their mental instability. Felice is trying to finish his latest script, The Two-Character Play, which is about a brother and sister trapped in a tumble-down Southern mansion after the murder-suicide of their parents. As you might imagine, the lives of the two actors and their characters intersect and become entangled before the night is over. Tennessee Williams spent more than a decade writing The Two-Character Play, which is an experimental, meta-textual exploration of his frequent themes of family and stage. The Midnight Company presents this later play as part of the Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. Michelle Hand and Joe Hanrahan star in the production, which is performed at 7:30 p.m

  • May 14 | 12 - 10 PM

    Maifest 2016

    Urban Chestnut Brewing Company 3229 Washington Ave. St. Louis - Grand Center

    Munich's famed bock beer actually originated in the northern German city of Einbeck. Bavarian nobility loved the stuff and enticed a local braumeister to make something similar. The only thing that changed was the name — "bock" being how the Bavarians pronounced the original beer's name. "Bock" also means goat in German, hence the goats that often appear on labels and bottle caps. The bock is the preferred style for welcoming the arrival of spring — it's a strong, malty lager that is eminently drinkable, and particularly refreshing when taken outdoors. Try it for yourself from noon to 10 p.m. today at Maifest 2016 at Urban Chestnut Midtown Brewery (3229 Washington Avenue; www.urbanchestnut.com). The taps will have a full line of bock varieties, including Erlkönig (a pale wheat doppelbock), Maximilian (a traditional, deep-brown wheat beer) and the incredible Oxnbräu, perhaps the finest doppelbock on this side of the planet. All beer and food must be purchased with tickets, which cost $6 each. There's also an $18 festival package that includes a commemorative glass and three beer and food tickets.

  • May 15 | 10 AM

    Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis

    Grand Center and the Central Corridor N. Grand Blvd. & Lindell Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63103

    May 11-15

    St. Louis pays homage to the city’s favorite playwright with this first annual theater festival.  A variety of theatrical, artistic and educational events presented on both conventional and unexpected stages will celebrate the art and influence of Tennessee Williams

  • May 15 | 12 PM - 8 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 15 | 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 15 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • May 15 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 15 | 7 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 15 | 11 AM - 4 PM

    Linda Skrainka: Reflections – CLOSING DAY

    Saint Louis University-Museum of Art 3663 Lindell Blvd.

    Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Continues through May 15

    This critical survey of Linda Skrainka’s work features more than 50 paintings and drawings created by the native St. Louisan. Her interest in the small details that make each person’s life unique informs her work, which is in turn supported by excerpts from her journals. These written passages reveal her concerns about both her process and her technical skills. They also serve to place each piece in the larger context of her life. Reflections remains up through Sunday, May 15, and the museum is open Wednesday through Sunday.

  • May 15 | 10 AM - 4 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 15 | 9 AM - 9 PM

    The Science and Spirit of Death, Grief and Beyond

    Sheraton Westport Lakeside Chalet I-270 and Page Ave. Maryland Heights

    A four-day experiential conference featuring the best and the brightest in afterlife research, end-of-life care, bereavement and spiritual approaches to a higher understanding of death and beyond. Medics, mystics, scholars and spiritualists share their wisdom in workshops, lectures, sacred ceremonies and more!

  • May 15 | 3 PM

    The Two-Character Play

    The Learning Center 4504 Westminster Place St. Louis - Central West End

    Thu., May 12, 7:30 p.m., Fri., May 13, 8 p.m., Sat., May 14, 3 p.m. and Sun., May 15, 3 p.m.

    Felice and his sister Clare are both actors. They're stuck in an unnamed theater, abandoned by the company they were traveling with because of their mental instability. Felice is trying to finish his latest script, The Two-Character Play, which is about a brother and sister trapped in a tumble-down Southern mansion after the murder-suicide of their parents. As you might imagine, the lives of the two actors and their characters intersect and become entangled before the night is over. Tennessee Williams spent more than a decade writing The Two-Character Play, which is an experimental, meta-textual exploration of his frequent themes of family and stage. The Midnight Company presents this later play as part of the Tennessee Williams Festival St. Louis. Michelle Hand and Joe Hanrahan star in the production, which is performed at 7:30 p.m

  • May 15 | 7:30 AM - 3 PM

    Berry Bike Ride and Strawberry Festival

    Township Park 239 W. Main St., St. Jacob Outstate IL

    You are as welcome as the flowers in May! Join us for our most popular ride of the year. Glide past freshly planted fields and soak in the spring sun. This sweet ride ends with strawberry shortcake at the 32nd annual St. Jacob Strawberry Festival. #BerryBikeRide Starting Location: St. Jacob Township Park Registration: 7:30 to 10:00 a.m. Mileage: 7, 23, 38, 54, 100* Terrain: flat to gently rolling, no big hills Price: Members: $11 online, $15 at event / Non-members: $16 online, $20 at event (*$10 supplement for century)
  • May 16 | 7:30 AM - 10:30 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 16 | 10 AM - 4 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 17 | 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 17 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • May 17 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 17 | 12 - 8 PM

    Winter/Spring Exhibition

    The Sheldon 3648 Washington

    Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 21

    The Sheldon welcomes spring (it's almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile,Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Storiestakes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

  • May 17 | 10 AM - 8 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 17 | 7:30 AM - 10:30 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 17 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 18 | 7:30 AM - 10:30 PM

    Audubon and Beyond

    University of Missouri-St. Louis-Mercantile Library 1 University Dr. at Natural Bridge Road, Normandy North St. Louis County

    Mondays-Thursdays, 7:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., Sundays, 12-8 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 15, 2017

    Among those of the ornithological persuasion, the St. Louis region is of prime interest because of our natural flyways. The Mississippi River underwrites that status; it's a superhighway for migrating birds. We have another feathered fact to boast about: While the renowned birdman John James Audubon was still alive, the St. Louis Mercantile Library acquired a rare reserved copy of his masterwork, Birds of America, from his family. This is tantamount to owning a Gutenberg Bible. Celebrate it with the exhibit Audubon and Beyond: Collecting Five Centuries of Natural History at the St. Louis Mercantile Library on the University of Missouri-St. Louis campus (1 University Drive at Natural Bridge Road; 314-516-7240 or www.umsl.edu/mercantile). The extensive exhibit incorporates sections relating to not only birds but also reptiles, mammals, fish, insects, humans, astronomy, geology, meteorology and more

  • May 18 | 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 18 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • May 18 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 18 | 12 - 5 PM

    Winter/Spring Exhibition

    The Sheldon 3648 Washington

    Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 21

    The Sheldon welcomes spring (it's almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile,Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Storiestakes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

  • May 18 | 10 AM - 4 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • May 18 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 18 | 7:30 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 19 | 7 PM

    Five Presidents

    Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd, St. Louis 63112

    he most powerful office in the nation in his book FIVE PRESIDENTS: My Extraordinary Journey with Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford. This New York Times best-selling author walked alongside Presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy, Johnson, Nixon, and Ford, seeing them through the Cold War, the Cuban Missile Crisis, assassinations, wars, Watergate, and other world-changing events. Hill shares never-before-revealed anecdotes, bringing history intimately and vividly to life while shedding new light on the character and personality of each of these five presidents. Q&A and book signing following the program.  Doors open 6:30pm, program starts at 7pm.

  • May 19 | 10:00 AM–5:00 PM

    Andrea Stanislav: Convergence Infinite

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through June 19

    Chicago-born artist Andréa Stanislav draws inspiration from the history of the American Midwest, particularly those junctions where the natural world and civilization meet. For her new exhibition at the Saint Louis Art Museum,Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité, she created a four-channel video installation using camera drones. Each of the drones started from a fixed point marking one of the cardinal directions and then completed a choreographed dance along its journey before ending at the Apotheosis of St. Louis (the statue that watches over Art Hill). The cameras filmed culturally significant sites such as the Cahokia Mounds and the Mississippi, as well as more transitory elements of the region, such as bald eagles and river bluffs. The four films are shown together to reveal the seams where city and country come together. Also on display are Stanislav's mirrored sculptures and taxidermied animal installations, which contrast the artificial and the natural in puzzling ways. Andréa Stanislav: Convergence Infinité is on display in galleries 250 and 301 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park. The work remains up through Sunday, June 19, and the museum is open Tuesday through Sunday. Admission is free.

  • May 19 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • May 19 | 12 - 8 PM

    Winter/Spring Exhibition

    The Sheldon 3648 Washington

    Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Tuesdays, 12-8 p.m. and Wednesdays-Fridays, 12-5 p.m. Continues through May 21

    The Sheldon welcomes spring (it's almost here) with three new exhibitions. The main galleries house Printmaking in St. Louis Now, a deep slice of the work being done by local fine art print presses and printmakers. Evil Prints, Firecracker Press and Pele Prints are all represented in the show, as are 27 individual artists, including Bunny Burson, Lisa Bulawsky, Alicia LaChance and Leslie Laskey. Meanwhile,Frank Trankina: Superheroes and Night Storiestakes over the Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Gallery. The Chicago painter crafts still-life portraits of vintage figurines and toys that often have a subtle narrative element. The Ann Lee and Wilfred Konneker Gallery is reserved for Susan Hacker Stang: reAPPEARANCES. These eight images were made using a toy digital camera with a plastic lens, and capture iconic locations and symbols that reveal a continuing series of human connections across different cultures.

  • May 19 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 19 | 7:30 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 20 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 21 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 21 | 8 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 22 | 7 PM

    Yentl

    Jewish Community Center-Wool Studio Theatre 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis Maryland Heights

    Yentl is a bright and strong-willed young woman who loves debating Jewish law with her father, a rabbi. When he dies, Yentl loses her intellectual outlet. To continue her studies, she decides to go against tradition and enroll in a yeshiva. But first she has to cut her hair and disguise herself as young man — and so Anshel is born. Her ruse is successful until she realizes she has romantic feelings for her study partner, Avigdor. Yentl was adapted for the stage by Leah Napolin from the Isaac Bashevis Singer story "Yentl the Yeshiva Boy." When Barbra Streisand rewrote it for the screen, Yentl became a musical. The New Jewish Theatre's new production takes the action back to the stage but keeps the musical element — except this time the songs were composed by folk-pop musician Jill Sobule. The New Jewish Theatre closes its season with a new Yentl at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, 8 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday (May 11 to June 5) in the Wool Studio Theatre at the Jewish Community Center

  • May 24 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 25 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 26 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 27 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
  • May 28 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    outside in, inside out – CLOSING DAY

    Atrium Gallery 4814 Washington Ave.

    Tuesdays-Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through May 28
    Atrium Gallery invites you to our spring exhibition, "outside in, inside out," featuring a rich and dramatic group of works by esteemed national and international artist, Steven Sorman. The exhibition will feature both large scale as well as intimate pieces, giving a full range of the compositional, and technical elements and aesthetic qualities of Sorman's work that have earned his valued international reputation as a major artist of our time.
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Date: April 18, 2015 Time: 10:00am