Events Calendar

I Love Jazz provides this calendar as part of our commitment to promote the live jazz experience. It includes just some of the many opportunities in the St. Louis area to hear and see jazz performed by local, national, and international artists.

If your venue, educational institution, or jazz group would like to be included on the Jazz Calendar – contact John Baker at john@hectv.org.

For show times and ticket information – contact the venue or follow the link provided.

 

June 2016
  • 1st Wednesday
  • 2nd Thursday
  • 3rd Friday
  • 4th Saturday
  • 5th Sunday
  • 6th Monday
  • 7th Tuesday
  • 8th Wednesday
  • 9th Thursday
  • 10th Friday
  • 11th Saturday
  • 12th Sunday
  • 13th Monday
  • 14th Tuesday
  • 15th Wednesday
  • 16th Thursday
  • 17th Friday
  • 18th Saturday
  • 19th Sunday
  • 20th Monday
  • 21st Tuesday
  • 22nd Wednesday
  • 23rd Thursday
  • 24th Friday
  • 25th Saturday
  • 26th Sunday
  • 27th Monday
  • 28th Tuesday
  • 29th Wednesday
  • 30th Thursday
  • June 3 | 8:00 PM

    The Two-Character Play

    Winter Opera's building (2322 Marconi Avenue

    The Midnight Company's production of The Two-Character Play was well-received at the inaugural Tennessee Williams Festival -- so much so that the company has extended the run. The play revolves around Felice and his sister Clare, both actors. They're stuck in an unnamed theater, abandoned by the company they were traveling with because of their mental instability. Felice is trying to finish his latest script, The Two-Character Play, which is about a brother and sister trapped in a tumble-down Southern mansion after the murder-suicide of their parents. As you might imagine, the lives of the two actors and their characters intersect and become entangled before the night is over. Tennessee Williams spent more than a decade writing The Two-Character Play, which is an experimental, meta-textual exploration of his frequent themes of family and stage. Michelle Hand and Joe Hanrahan star in the production, which is performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday through June 4 at Winter Opera's building (2322 Marconi Avenue. Tickets are $15.

  • June 4 | 8:00 PM

    The Two-Character Play

    Winter Opera's building (2322 Marconi Avenue

    The Midnight Company's production of The Two-Character Play was well-received at the inaugural Tennessee Williams Festival -- so much so that the company has extended the run. The play revolves around Felice and his sister Clare, both actors. They're stuck in an unnamed theater, abandoned by the company they were traveling with because of their mental instability. Felice is trying to finish his latest script, The Two-Character Play, which is about a brother and sister trapped in a tumble-down Southern mansion after the murder-suicide of their parents. As you might imagine, the lives of the two actors and their characters intersect and become entangled before the night is over. Tennessee Williams spent more than a decade writing The Two-Character Play, which is an experimental, meta-textual exploration of his frequent themes of family and stage. Michelle Hand and Joe Hanrahan star in the production, which is performed at 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday through June 4 at Winter Opera's building (2322 Marconi Avenue. Tickets are $15.

  • June 28 | 10:00 AM - 9:00 PM
    chess_painting_no._62_grimme_luuring_ree_krabbe_vs._du

    Tom Hackney: Corresponding Squares — Painting the Chess Games of Marcel Duchamp

    World Chess Hall of Fame 4652 Maryland Ave St. Louis - Central West End

    This exhibit runs Wednesdays-Fridays from 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Mondays, Tuesdays, and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays from 12-5 p.m. It continues through Sept. 11

    French avant-garde artist Marcel Duchamp was an avowed chess fanatic. While the analytical portion of Duchamp's brain was playing the game, his artistic side was enchanted with the patterns created by the movement of his pieces. Inspired by Duchamp's unique view of chess, British artist Tom Hackney created geometric paintings of individual games, particularly those played by Duchamp himself. Chess Painting No. 54 (Michel vs. Duchamp, Strasbourg, 1924) features criss-crossing yellow slashes left by both bishops’ progress, the red charge of the king’s knight ending prematurely in an apparent capture, and a white defensive wall of pawns dominating the central foreground.

  • June 28 | 4:00 PM & 8:00 PM

    It Shoulda Been You

    111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood

    Weddings are chaos with a built-in documentarian. On Rebecca and Brian's wedding day, no photographer could hope to capture everything that goes wrong. Brian's WASPy mother and Rebecca's Jewish mother keep slinging insults, Brian's dad thinks it's not too late to get Rebecca to sign a pre-nup and the bride's sister has called the bride's ex and inadvertently invited him to the wedding. And let's not forget about eavesdroppin' Aunt Sheila and her habit of listening in on private conversations. Barbara Anselmi and Brian Hargrove's musical.

    It Shoulda Been You is a fast-paced and funny trip down the aisle, which is why Stages St. Louis opens its new season with the comedy. It Shoulda Been You is performed at 4 and 8 p.m. at the Robert G. Reim Theatre (111 South Geyer Road, Kirkwood) every day except Monday through July 3. Tickets are $20 to $59.

  • June 28 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • June 28 | 8:15 PM

    The Muny: 42nd Street

    The Muny

    The Muny continues its 98th season with 42nd Street which will run through June 30th at the Muny in Forest Park (314-361-1900 or www.muny.org). If you don't want to wait in line for the free seats, tickets cost $14 to $90, and the show starts at 8:15 p.m.

  • June 28 | 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM

    Mission To Mars

    5050 Oakland Avenue

    NASA is currently working toward the goal of putting humans on Mars in the 2030s. The space agency just last week opened the astronaut application process for the class of 2017, which indicates a certain urgency. If you're eager to see what the future holds, the Mission: Mars exhibition at the Saint Louis Science Center is the place to be. This interactive display is developed by the science center, Washington University and NASA and is divided into two parts. Mission Control gives you the chance to program and remotely drive a simulated Mars rover, complete with the time delay caused by the signal transit time between Earth and Mars. Mission Mars — Base lets you take on the role of an explorer on the Red Planet in the year 2076. You'll conduct scientific operations at key points using one of the science center's two rovers. Mission: Mars is open daily, and admission is free.

  • June 28 |
    dc17b595_stuart_little

    Stewart Little

    Mermen Theatre (on the Mermen Campus) 11333 Big Bend Road, St Louis MO 63122.

    Meramec Theatre Presents their Summer Children's Production, Stewart Little. Based on the book by E.B. White and directed by Michelle Rebollo the performance runs June 28, and 29, 2016 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.  Admission is Free. Reservations required for the 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. performances. To make reservations or if you have questions, please call the Box Office at (314) 984-7562. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the performance.

  • June 28 | 5:30 - 8:30 PM

    #WeAreOrlando Benefit for Victims of the Orlando Tragedy

    Just John's Club 4112 Manchester Ave. St. Louis - Forest Park Southeast

    A gathering in solidarity to raise money for the Pulse Victims Fund to benefit those affected by the horrible tragedy in Orlando. There will be raffles, door prizes, drink specials, and great company. 100% of proceeds will go directly to the Pulse Victims Fund. 20 plus businesses have contributed raffle prizes and many more are expected. We are suggesting a $10 donation at entry but if that is not in your budget please come out anyway as your support means more than monetary donations.

  • June 29 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Gigi Scaria: Time

    Laumeier Sculpture Park 12580 Rott Rd.

    Wednesday–Sunday from 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. until Aug. 14

    The future is built on the bones of the past. Cities expand from the remains of villages, but some part of those villages remain in the form of names or memories. New Delhi-based artist Gigi Scaria is interested in the way territorial, cultural and environmental elements can survive the passage of time. His new exhibition explores the peculiar growth of St. Louis atop the Mound Builder culture that existed along the Mississippi long before the French arrived. His outdoor sculpture Time combines the form of Cahokia Mounds' Woodhenge with the modern concrete high-rise building. A further selection of Scaria’s recent photographs and films is on display inside Laumeier’s Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center until Aug. 14.

  • June 29 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night

    Missouri History Museum in Forest Park

    Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. and Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Sept. 5

    There was a time in America when wearing black was reserved only for those mourning the death of a loved one. When did black make the jump to evening wear, and then to everyday use? Little Black Dress: From Mourning to Night, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, charts the hue's long journey to daylight through the most versatile of garments. The exhibit showcases more than 60 dresses from the museum's collection, offering a broad view of how women's fashions have changed. The tapered-waist, puff-sleeved "second-day dress" from 1895 (worn by a bride the day after her wedding) looks more uncomfortable and rigid than a mourning dress from the same decade, while the 1933 halter evening gown looks elegant and chic. What a difference 40 years, a world war and the flapper movement makes. Little Black Dress is open daily (April 2 through September 5). Admission is free.

  • June 29 | 8:15 PM

    The Muny: 42nd Street

    The Muny

    The Muny continues its 98th season with 42nd Street which will run through June 30th at the Muny in Forest Park (314-361-1900 or www.muny.org). If you don't want to wait in line for the free seats, tickets cost $14 to $90, and the show starts at 8:15 p.m.

  • June 29 | 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM

    Mission To Mars

    5050 Oakland Avenue

    NASA is currently working toward the goal of putting humans on Mars in the 2030s. The space agency just last week opened the astronaut application process for the class of 2017, which indicates a certain urgency. If you're eager to see what the future holds, the Mission: Mars exhibition at the Saint Louis Science Center is the place to be. This interactive display is developed by the science center, Washington University and NASA and is divided into two parts. Mission Control gives you the chance to program and remotely drive a simulated Mars rover, complete with the time delay caused by the signal transit time between Earth and Mars. Mission Mars — Base lets you take on the role of an explorer on the Red Planet in the year 2076. You'll conduct scientific operations at key points using one of the science center's two rovers. Mission: Mars is open daily, and admission is free.

  • June 29 | 10:00 AM, 2:00 PM AND 5:00 PM

    Omnimax: A Beautiful Planet

    St. Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue)

    Filmmaker Toni Myers wrote and directed the 2002 IMAX documentary Space Station 3D, which was about the construction of the International Space Station. Fourteen years later she's returned to the space station for her new documentary, A Beautiful Planet. Using footage shot by astronauts and by cameras mounted on the station, Myers' new IMAX film offers a spectacular view of Earth. You'll see a lightning storm popping like camera flashes from under heavy clouds, the unblinking eye of a hurricane and the surreal sight of the aurora borealis from above. You'll also see the continents aglow with electricity in the dark, and the greenish-brownish haze of our atmosphere as the station races around the globe once every 92 minutes. A Beautiful Planet is now showing daily at the OMNIMAX theater at the St. Louis Science Center. Tickets are $7 to $10.

  • June 29 |

    Grow

    Saint Louis Science Center 5050 Oakland Ave. St. Louis - Forest Park

    If foodie culture has an upside, it's that more people care now about the origins of the food they eat. So where does our food come from? This question and many others are answered in the new exhibition, Grow, at the Saint Louis Science Center. The former site of the Exploradome is now a series of educational stations that explain everything from water conservation and the basics of botany to the care and feeding (and milking) of animals at the Animal Corral (which will have visiting livestock on select days). Grow also welcomes a series of visiting artists who have reinvented the chicken coop and created a system of condos for bees. Grow will be a permanent exhibition at the Science Center, and admission is free.

  • June 29 |
    dc17b595_stuart_little

    Stewart Little

    Mermen Theatre (on the Mermen Campus) 11333 Big Bend Road, St Louis MO 63122.

    Meramec Theatre Presents their Summer Children's Production, Stewart Little. Based on the book by E.B. White and directed by Michelle Rebollo the performance runs June 28, and 29, 2016 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.  Admission is Free. Reservations required for the 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. performances. To make reservations or if you have questions, please call the Box Office at (314) 984-7562. Doors open 30 minutes prior to the performance.

  • June 29 | 4:00 PM - 7:00 PM

    Schlafly Farmers’ Market

    7260 Southwest Ave. Maplewood

    Come and buy local, farm fresh eggs, pork, lamb, beef, herbs, mushrooms, artisanal loaves, flowers and more straight from the source. Schlafly Farmers Market presents a unique opportunity to fill your basket with local food while chatting with the people who actually grew, raised, or made it. Wednesdays, 4-7 p.m. through Oct. 26

  • June 29 | 7:00 PM

    Natashia Deon Book Signing – Grace

    Left Bank Books 399 N Euclid Ave St. Louis - Central West End

    For a runaway slave in the 1840s south, life on the run can be just as dangerous as life under a sadistic Massa. That’s what 15-year-old Naomi learns after she escapes the brutal confines of an Alabama plantation. Striking out on her own, she takes refuge in a Georgia brothel and falls into a star-crossed affair with a smooth-talking white man. The product of their union is Josey, who becomes caught in the tide of history when news of the Emancipation Proclamation reaches the declining estate.

  • June 30 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Julian Rosefeldt: American Night

    Washington University-Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum 1 Brookings Drive

    Mondays, Wednesdays-Sundays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 7

    You'll swear that a certain squint-eyed, mustachioed man in Julian Rosefeldt's five-channel film installation American Night is Charles Bronson -- but you'll be wrong. Instead, the man is an actor, one of several in the film who resembles an archetypal cowboy film star.American Night is shot in widescreen, 16mm CinemaScope -- a popular format for the Western -- and uses actual dialogue from classic films, George W. Bush's speeches and footage of modern combat troops to show how the mythology of the Hollywood Western has infiltrated American culture and politics. It's a long hard look at the fictions that drive our reality, as seen by an outsider (Rosefeldt is German).

  • June 30 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Camera Work Exhibition

    International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum 3415 Olive St.

    Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 2

    We are pleased to be able to present a selection of plates from Camera Work, highlighting portraits, landscape studies and illustrations contained in editions issued from 1905-1913. Stieglitz’s perseverance and dedication to championing innovative photographic work opened the door for the acceptance of the medium—especially in America—as a valid creative tool. Although the aesthetics of pictorial photography began to wane in the 1920s, the ability of thought-provoking images to move us has continued to the present day.

  • June 30 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs

    St. Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 17

    The Saint Louis Art Museum is constantly acquiring new pieces for its collection. In the past decade, more than 700 artworks have been added — A Decade of Collecting Prints, Drawings and Photographs features just 62 of them, but the quality can’t be beat. The worried woman in Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother is a familiar face thanks to its frequent use in publications, but now you can stand eye-to-eye with her. If you gaze on the technical perfection of Martin Schongauer’s fifteenth-century engraving The Nativity and find yourself craving more, you should make an appointment to visit the museum’s Study Room for Prints, Drawings and Photographs. More than 14,000 works are available for closer examination, and it costs nothing to view them.

  • June 30 |

    Circus Flora: Pastime

    3511 Samuel Shepard Drive

    Pastime, this year's show and Circus Flora's 30th anniversary, is a celebration of baseball. The tumbling St. Louis Arches, the high-wire-walking Flying Wallendas and those daring young men on the flying trapeze are a stand-up triple, but the air-conditioned tent is like stealing home.

    Circus Flora: Pastime is performed 7 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 1 and 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 1 and 5:30 p.m. Sunday (June 2 through July 3) at the Circus Flora Big Top (3511 Samuel Shepard Drive). Tickets are $10 to $48.

  • June 30 | 8:15 PM

    The Muny: 42nd Street

    The Muny

    The Muny continues its 98th season with 42nd Street which will run through June 30th at the Muny in Forest Park (314-361-1900 or www.muny.org). If you don't want to wait in line for the free seats, tickets cost $14 to $90, and the show starts at 8:15 p.m.

  • June 30 | 11:00 AM AND 3:00PM

    Omnimax: Living In The Age of Airplanes

    St. Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue)

    The airplane has changed our world, but do we really understand exactly how much? Living In The Age of Airplanes reminds us how profoundly this amazing invention has changed the way we do just about everything.  It also renews our appreciation for the airplane and stunningly conveys the wonder and grandeur of flying. Not that long ago, traveling between continents was a migration. Now, on any given day, 100,000 flights transport people and products between any two points on Earth in a matter of hours. Indeed, the airplane may be the closest thing we have to a time machine. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, the film explores the countless ways the airplane affects our lives (even when we don’t fly). With a fascinating take on history, breathtaking visuals, soaring music, and a truly unique perspective, Living In The Age of Airplanes shows the airplane in a fresh light as it takes audiences on a wondrous trip around the globe. Living In The Age of Airplanes is now showing daily at the OMNIMAX theater at the St. Louis Science Center. Tickets are $7 to $10.

  • June 30 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

    Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue)

    Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending in Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. This free exhibit is open on Mondays and Wednesdays-Sundays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m and continues through July 16, 2017.

  • June 30 | 8:00 PM

    Company

    Heagney Theatre 530 E. Lockwood Ave. Webster Groves

    On the night of his 35th birthday, confirmed bachelor Robert contemplates his unmarried state. Over the course of a series of dinners, drinks, and a wedding, his friends-"those good and crazy people [his] married friends"-explain the pros and cons of a spouse. Company is largely regarded as a trailblazer of dark-comedy, modern musical genre and the winner of 7 Tony's including Best Musical, Best Score, Best Lyrics and Best Book. This production by Insight Theater stars Martin Fox & Laurie McConnell and runs through July 3 - 8 p.m. on Thursdays and 2:00 p.m. Sundays. Tickets are $10 - $30 dollars.

  • June 30 |

    CAM: Drink In Art

    Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis 3750 Washington Blvd. St. Louis - Grand Center

    CAM and the Pulitzer Arts Foundation bring you a two-for-one Museum experience paired with two-for-one drinks and appetizer specials! Make your way through current exhibitions at both institutions, and enjoy sips and bites in the CAM cafe. CAM and the Pulitzer are open until 8:00 pm every Thursday and Friday evening. Drink in Art runs Thursdays from 5-7 p.m. through Aug. 11.

  • June 30 | 6:30 - 8:30 PM

    James And The Giant Peach

    Chesterfield Amphitheater 631 Veterans Place Drive Chesterfield

    STAGES presents the theatrical production of “James & the Giant Peach,” the story of an orphan with terrible aunts for guardians, befriends human-like bugs who live inside a giant peach, who take the boy on a journey to New York City. The performance is free - weather permitting.

  • July 1 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Gigi Scaria: Time

    Laumeier Sculpture Park 12580 Rott Rd.

    Wednesday–Sunday from 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. until Aug. 14

    The future is built on the bones of the past. Cities expand from the remains of villages, but some part of those villages remain in the form of names or memories. New Delhi-based artist Gigi Scaria is interested in the way territorial, cultural and environmental elements can survive the passage of time. His new exhibition explores the peculiar growth of St. Louis atop the Mound Builder culture that existed along the Mississippi long before the French arrived. His outdoor sculpture Time combines the form of Cahokia Mounds' Woodhenge with the modern concrete high-rise building. A further selection of Scaria’s recent photographs and films is on display inside Laumeier’s Adam Aronson Fine Arts Center until Aug. 14.

  • July 1 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road

    Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park

    Fridays, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. and Tuesdays-Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through Aug. 21

    The Silk Road carried goods and trade items from China to Europe, which fostered the exchange of different cultures and artistic styles. One of the most prized of Eastern artistic items was the carpet. These textiles incorporated sacred symbols, tribal iconography and traditional patterns, depending on who wove them. A carpet made by Central Asian nomads doesn't look like one made by Indian artisans, despite Europeans lumping them all under the catch-all descriptor "Oriental rug." From Caravans to Courts: Textiles from the Silk Road, the new exhibition in gallery 100 at the Saint Louis Art Museum in Forest Park, features ten carpets that exemplify the high level of artistry and craftsmanship found in traditional Asian textile work. The exhibit is open Tuesday through Sunday (April 1 to August 21), and admission is free.

  • July 1 | 11 AM - 5 PM

    Camera Work Exhibition

    International Photography Hall of Fame and Museum 3415 Olive St.

    Wednesdays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues through July 2

    We are pleased to be able to present a selection of plates from Camera Work, highlighting portraits, landscape studies and illustrations contained in editions issued from 1905-1913. Stieglitz’s perseverance and dedication to championing innovative photographic work opened the door for the acceptance of the medium—especially in America—as a valid creative tool. Although the aesthetics of pictorial photography began to wane in the 1920s, the ability of thought-provoking images to move us has continued to the present day.

  • July 1 |

    Circus Flora: Pastime

    3511 Samuel Shepard Drive

    Pastime, this year's show and Circus Flora's 30th anniversary, is a celebration of baseball. The tumbling St. Louis Arches, the high-wire-walking Flying Wallendas and those daring young men on the flying trapeze are a stand-up triple, but the air-conditioned tent is like stealing home.

    Circus Flora: Pastime is performed 7 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, 1 and 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 1 and 5:30 p.m. Sunday (June 2 through July 3) at the Circus Flora Big Top (3511 Samuel Shepard Drive). Tickets are $10 to $48.

  • July 1 | 12:00 PM AND 4:00 PM

    Omnimax: National Parks Adventure

    St. Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue)

    National Parks Adventure takes audiences on the ultimate off-trail adventure into America’s awe-inspiring great outdoors. For 100 years, such spectacularly wild and beautiful places as Yellowstone, Yosemite, the Everglades, the Redwoods, and Arches have been a living monument to the nation’s vast and untamed wilderness. Now, captured with IMAX® cameras and shown in full glory on the world’s largest screens, National Parks Adventure, narrated by Academy Award® winner Robert Redford, celebrates the majesty of these treasured landscapes. National Parks Adventure is now showing daily at the OMNIMAX theater at the St. Louis Science Center. Tickets are $7 to $10.

  • July 1 | 11:00 AM AND 3:00PM

    Omnimax: Living In The Age of Airplanes

    St. Louis Science Center (5050 Oakland Avenue)

    The airplane has changed our world, but do we really understand exactly how much? Living In The Age of Airplanes reminds us how profoundly this amazing invention has changed the way we do just about everything.  It also renews our appreciation for the airplane and stunningly conveys the wonder and grandeur of flying. Not that long ago, traveling between continents was a migration. Now, on any given day, 100,000 flights transport people and products between any two points on Earth in a matter of hours. Indeed, the airplane may be the closest thing we have to a time machine. Filmed in 18 countries across all 7 continents, the film explores the countless ways the airplane affects our lives (even when we don’t fly). With a fascinating take on history, breathtaking visuals, soaring music, and a truly unique perspective, Living In The Age of Airplanes shows the airplane in a fresh light as it takes audiences on a wondrous trip around the globe. Living In The Age of Airplanes is now showing daily at the OMNIMAX theater at the St. Louis Science Center. Tickets are $7 to $10.

  • July 1 | 10 AM - 5 PM

    Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis

    Missouri History Museum (Lindell Boulevard and DeBaliviere Avenue)

    Before the interstate highway system was developed, Route 66 was the safest, fastest way to cross the western half of the country. Starting in Chicago and ending in Santa Monica, the "Main Street of America" came right though St. Louis, but not in the mostly straight lines we're accustomed to now. At various points in time, Route 66 traversed Watson Road, Manchester Road, the Martin Luther King Bridge and the Poplar Street Bridge. That shifting route helped spur the growth of cities and businesses along the way, as travelers stopped overnight at the Coral Court Motel or grabbed a bit to eat at the Parkmoor Restaurant. Route 66: Main Street Through St. Louis, the new exhibition at the Missouri History Museum, tells the story of the byway through roadside signs and gas pumps, historic vehicles, bus tours and photographs. This free exhibit is open on Mondays and Wednesdays-Sundays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-8 p.m and continues through July 16, 2017.

  • July 1 |
    riverfest-Fireworks

    Riverfest 2016

    Frontier Park First Capitol Dr & S Riverside Drive, St Charles St. Charles

    Riverfest includes four days of food and fireworks in Frontier Park with live music every day from bands such as Cree Rider Family Band, John Henry and the Funky Butt Brass Band. There's a children's area with art projects by Foundry Art Centre, the Bubble Bus cranks it up every day, and food & craft vendors. The parade starts at 10 a.m on Monday. The festival runs Monday. Fri., July 1, 5-10:30 p.m., Sat., July 2, 12-10:30 p.m., Sun., July 3, 12-10:30 p.m. and Mon., July 4, 12-10:30 p.m.

  • July 1 |

    Fair St. Louis

    Art Hill in Forest Park

    Since 1981, the Fair St. Louis Foundation (formerly the Veiled Prophet Fair Foundation)- in partnership with the City of St. Louis- has hosted a spectacular celebration featuring live music, educational activities, air shows and spectacular fireworks over the Fourth of July weekend.

    The musical line up this year includes Dirty Muggs, Here Come the Mummies, George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic, Flo Rida, Cowboy Mouth, Michael Anthony, Eddie Money, and Sammy Hagar and The Circle. Festivities also include the Schuncks Freedom Four Miler and the Veiled Prophet Parade.

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Date: April 18, 2015 Time: 10:00am