Mantis Shrimp Eyes: Incredible Vision Decoded for Imaging Technologies & Early Cancer Detection

Mantis shrimp -aggressive, predatory sea crustaceans – have among the most sophisticated vision of all animals. A group of researchers, including Viktor Gruev, PhD, is recreating that vision to make specialized sensors and cameras that could bring more precision to biomedical imaging. Mantis shrimp eyes have extra sensors that allows them to see polarized light. Inspired by the mantis shrimp’s superior eyesight, researchers are building polarization cameras that could be used to help diagnose and remove cancerous tumors. At Washington University, Spencer Lake, PhD is using a polarization camera for studying ligaments. Lake is making strides toward improving ACL and PCL reconstruction surgeries.

This series explores the latest science and technology news in the St. Louis area.

Mantis Shrimp Eyes: Incredible Vision Decoded for Imaging Technologies & Early Cancer Detection

Recent Segment | Innovations

Cornfield Robot: Mizzou Researchers Use Robotics in the Study of Corn and Drought Tolerance

Mizzou engineers develop a robotic system to help develop drought tolerant corn. It's changing the way scientists study climate variability and crops.

Recent Segment | Innovations

The Global Inventory Project: Transforming Agriculture with Perennial Crops

The Missouri Botanical Garden is identifying plant species to develop into perennial crops for sustainable agriculture.

Recent Segment | Innovations

New Device Treats Uterine Fibroids Without Any Incisions

An incision-free device designed to reduce heavy menstrual bleeding caused by uterine fibroids is introduced at Mercy Hospital St. Louis.

Recent Segment | Innovations

New Way to Clean Cancer-Causing Chromium From Drinking Water

A Washington University engineer has found a new way to clean chromium from tap water using electricity.

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Recent Segment | Innovations

Celebrity Deaths Create Awareness about Aortic Dissection & Treatment at Mercy Hospital St. Louis

Aortic dissection is often undetected and undiagnosed, resulting in death. Mercy Vascular Surgeon Dr. Vito Mantese explains a new lifesaving treatment.

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Date: April 18, 2015 Time: 10:00am